5 Ways to Stay on the Bike Through the Winter

Here’s how we do it:

1) Studded Tires – Today, you can get studded tires from 30mm to 4.8in wide to fit mountain bikes at all wheel sizes, and any disc brake road bike (and Seven’s RedSky series, too, if you like rim brakes). Nothing provides the confidence to take on winter riding quite like a pair of studded tires.

2) Bar Mitts and Boots – Hands and feet bear the brunt of the cold when you’re riding, so we like Bar Mitts to keep our hands warm, and a pair of serious winter cycling boots like these or these. You will be surprised how much easier it is to get out the door once you’ve solved the problem of cold hands and feet.

3) Layers – One of the great things about riding is that it raises your body temperature, so you won’t be cold long. That means that your best strategy for regulating comfort will be layering your clothing. We like full zip jerseys and jackets that we can open when we’re warming and close when we’re cooling off.

4) Friends – We all like a solo ride for clearing our minds and simplifying things, but in winter we prefer to travel in packs. We’re more likely to show up for a ride if friends will be there.

5) Adventures – All the places we go during the year are different in winter. Sometimes the thrill of a cold weather ride is just in seeing old sights through new eyes. They say it’s the journey, not the destination, but in wintertime, we make sure the destination is part of the motivation.

1000km on the Seven RedSky S

We delivered Woody’s RedSky S in February of this year, via Adam and Saj at Get-a-Grip in Chicago. We received this photo, just this morning, which suggests Woody and his Seven are getting along pretty well.

He wrote:

Rode my Seven for the Great Lakes Randonneurs 1000k last weekend.  We were allowed 75 hours, completed it in 65.  Had decent weather, just one huge storm on Day 1 to contend with.  Great roads, terrific variety of terrain, and great support from the GLR volunteers.  My bike handled great.  Bombing hills, cornering with speed, bouncing across gravel sections—all good. 

Thanks,

Woody

RedSky – The Ultimate in Versatile Performance

Yesterday, we introduced Project RedSky. Today we want to look at this bike’s incredible versatility. To demonstrate, we offer photos of an eTap equipped RedSky wearing a wide range of tires.

With 23c tires, RedSky looks like any road bike. What you will notice, as we step up from 28c, to 32c, 33c, and finally to 30c studded, is that the bike always looks proportional, always looks purpose-built.

RedSky can very literally be your go-to fast, group ride bike, and also your winter time commuter (with 32c tires and fenders). You can ride mixed-terrain on it with an array of file treaded tires, or you can tour on it. It has hidden rack mounts at the dropouts.

We know a lot of our riders are hesitant to move to disc brakes, because they have already invested in quality rim brake wheels. RedSky solves this problem by giving those riders access to the same tires as they might run on a mixed-terrain or cyclocross bike.

Mavic 23c tireDSC_0006DSC_0012Rivendell Ruffy Tuffy 28c

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Clement X’Plor MSO 32c

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DSC_0012Rivendell Jack Brown 33cDSC_0023DSC_0030

Clement LAS 33c

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45 North Xerxes 30c studded

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Introducing Project RedSky

red-sky-axiom-sl-sideA red morning sky tells sailors that bad weather lies ahead. Project RedSky is our way of making all the bad weather days rideable, no, not just rideable, maximally rideable, lovable, to turn those rainy, snowy, off days into your favorite days to be out on the bike.

Here’s how we did it:

  • Lightweight:  A typical RedSky builds up at 1.5 to 2.0 lbs lighter than an equivalent disc brake bike.  The bike is the same weight as any lightweight road bike; the mid-reach brake calipers are only about 30 grams heavier than most lightweight short reach brakes.  The bike pictured tips the scales at 16.2 lbs with the MSO 32c tires; without pedals.
  • Tire Choices:  From a 23c road slick to a 33c knobby and everything in between, the RedSky is even more versatile than a true cyclocross bike.  On 33c tires, clearance is limited, but tire option versatility will be appreciated in some riding conditions.  True tire clearance depends on measured tire width, rim width, and brake caliper choice.  Perhaps most importantly, the RedSky can also fit studded tires.
  • All Weather:  Designed to fit fenders with up to 28c tires.
  • High Performance:  This design sacrifices nothing compared to any performance road bike.  It’s fast, agile, and accelerates with the best of bikes.
  • Optimal Handling:  Seven’s 5E fork allows for matching the fork rake to the frame geometry so there’s no compromise to the bike’s front end handling.
  • Hidden Fender Mounts:  At dropouts and chainstay bridge.  The mounts are there when you want them, but hidden when you don’t.
  • Travel Bike:  Simple brake system makes for fast, easy, and lightweight bike travel.

red-sky-axiom-sl-down-seat-clusterOverall, the Redsky provides you most of the benefits of an Evergreen — a versatile mixed-terrain disc brake bike — while being as light as a pure performance road bike. Designed specifically for harsh environments, the RedSky loves the rain, sleet, and even snow and ice.  Boston sees an average of 80 rain days a year; why miss that many days of riding?

The RedSky will make everyday a riding day.

What defines RedSky is its versatility. No other rim brake bike offers the same breadth of tire choices, rack and fender options, lighting possibilities.  We’ll show you, in the coming days, just a few of the ways you can build your Seven RedSky.